Posts Tagged ‘Local passwords

Local Administrator Password Selection

In most enterprises there are two types of passwords: local and domain. Domain passwords are centralized passwords that are authenticated at an authentication server (e.g., a Lightweight Directory Access Protocol server, an Active Directory server). Local passwords are passwords that are stored and authenticated on the local system (e.g., a workstation or server). Although most local passwords can be managed using centralized password management mechanisms, some can only be managed through third-party tools, scripts, or manual means. A common example is built-in administrator and root accounts. Having a common password shared among all local administrator or root accounts on all machines within a network simplifies system maintenance, but it is a widespread weakness. If a single machine is compromised, an attacker may be able to recover the password and use it to gain access to all other machines that use the shared password. Organizations should avoid using the same local administrator or root account password across many systems. Also, built-in accounts are often not affected by password policies and filters, so it may be easier to just disable the built-in accounts and use other administrator-level accounts instead.

A solution to this local password management problem is the use of randomly generated passwords, unique to each machine, and a central password database that is used to keep track of local passwords on client machines. Such a database should be strongly secured and access to it limited to only the minimum needed. Specific security controls to implement include only permitting authorized administrators from authorized hosts to access the data, requiring strong authentication to access the database (for example, multi-factor authentication), storing the passwords in the database in an encrypted form (e.g., cryptographic hash), and requiring administrators to verify the identity of the database server before providing authentication credentials to it.

Another solution to management of local account passwords is to generate passwords based on system characteristics such as machine name or media access control (MAC) address. For example, the local password could be based on a cryptographic hash of the MAC address and a standard password. A machine’s MAC address, “00:16:59:7F:2C:4D”, could be combined with the password “N1stSPsRul308” to form the string “00:16:59:7F:2C:4D N1stSPsRul308”. This string could be hashed using SHA and the first 20 characters of the hash used as the password for the machine. This would create a pseudo-salt that would prevent many attackers from discovering that there is a shared password. However, if an attacker recovers one local password, the attacker would be able to determine other local passwords relatively easily.

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