Transport Layer Security Protocol

TLS (Transport Layer Security) was released in response to the Internet community’s demands for a standardized protocol. The IETF provided a venue for the new protocol to be openly discussed, and encouraged developers to provide their input to the protocol.

The TLS protocol was released in January 1999 to create a standard for private communications. The protocol “allows client/server applications to communicate in a way that is designed to prevent eavesdropping,tampering or message forgery.” According to the protocol’s creators, the goals of the TLS protocol are cryptographic security, interoperability, extensibility, and relative efficiency.These goals are achieved through implementation of the TLS protocol on two levels: the TLS Record protocol and the TLS Handshake protocol.

TLS Record Protocol

The TLS Record protocol negotiates a private, reliable connection between the client and the server. Though the Record protocol can be used without encryption, it uses symmetric cryptography keys, to ensure a private connection. This connection is secured through the use of hash functions generated by using a Message Authentication Code.

TLS Handshake Protocol

The TLS Handshake protocol allows authenticated communication to commence between the server and client. This protocol allows the client and server to speak the same language, allowing them to agree upon an encryption algorithm and encryption keys before the selected application protocol begins to send data. Using the same handshake protocol procedure as SSL, TLS provides for authentication of the server, and optionally, the client.

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